Elle Jay-Bea

Thought collection of a struggling (but persistent) married medical student, who is also an atheist, an introvert, a feminist, and hearing-impaired.

My parents died years ago. I was very close to them. I still miss them terribly. I know I always will. I long to believe that their essence, their personalities, what I loved so much about them, are - really and truly - still in existence somewhere. […] Plainly, there’s something within me that’s ready to believe in life after death. And it’s not the least bit interested in whether there’s any sober evidence for it. So I don’t guffaw at the woman who visits her husband’s grave and chats him up every now and then, maybe on the anniversary of his death. It’s not hard to understand. And if I have difficulties with the ontological status of who she’s talking to, that’s all right. That’s not what this is about. This is about humans being human.

Carl Sagan on why sometimes it’s good to temporarily forgo your beliefs in order to respect someone else’s (via applepiesfromscratch)

(Source: carlsagan, via naciemew)

I really wish “Times New Roman” wasn’t the default font all the world over. Think of all the ink wasted on printing those superfluous little serifs. I much prefer the clear and to-the-point “Calibri” font.

Well-run libraries are filled with people because what a good library offers cannot be easily found elsewhere: an indoor public space in which you do not have to buy anything in order to stay. In the modern state there are very few sites where this is possible. The only others that come readily to my mind require belief in an omnipotent creator as a condition for membership. It would seem the most obvious thing in the world to say that the reason why the market is not an efficient solution to libraries is because the market has no use for a library. But it seems we need, right now, to keep re-stating the obvious. There aren’t many institutions left that fit so precisely Keynes’ definition of things that no one else but the state is willing to take on. Nor can the experience of library life be recreated online. It’s not just a matter of free books. A library is a different kind of social reality (of the three dimensional kind), which by its very existence teaches a system of values beyond the fiscal.

An interesting response to “Study: Women Don’t Choose STEM Careers Despite Their Skills”

"When I was younger, I used to assign blame to the factors mentioned above as well. Now, I have more perspective. There is actually an influx of young female talent every year in high tech, but their ranks thin out quickly. Many either head towards management, or simply look somewhere else. After being subjected to the biases the PP mentioned, those women who managed to forge ahead, will at some point start a family. Chances are, they will have found a great spouse, someone responsible, bright and with an equally sparkling career. Problem. In many STEM jobs, the salaries are sufficient to support a family on a single income. Many folks in the industry are men, with home maker wives. They can afford to stay late and sometimes skip vacations. They can also demand the same from their employees. The problem for many women is that a family cannot survive with two parents away from home for 10 hours a day each. And since the father usually makes more (usual pay bias), it’s easy to fall into the more traditional roles after a few heroic years of effort.

Notice how there are hardly any principal software engineers that are women? By the time their skills reached that level, other obligations started to apply the pressure. And high tech jobs are unforgiving.

So if you want to see more women in STEM career, the machismo of over-scheduled projects has got to stop. It’s not a matter of brains or even of education. The fact is, there are not enough mid-career choices for the women who currently train for STEM careers. Why would I encourage my daughter to follow such a narrowly focused education when I know that her career choices down the line will dwindle to a trickle?

This is not about giving women a pass and a shorter day. It’s about distributing work evenly, so that both women AND men can attend that band concert after school, and creating a culture where such activities do not jeopardize your reputation and career.

- Comment by “I.O.” in response to the article “Study: Women Don’t Choose STEM Careers Despite Their Skills”

http://www.techpageone.com/business/study-women-stem-careers/#.UeWhSo130m8

Yay for Kayla Stra!

“Kayla Stra’s baby can be in the jocks’ room. Her nanny can be with the baby. And both the mother and the nanny can do all the things they need to do. The CHRB will not tolerate discrimination in any form against anyone for any reason. No special rooms. No one goes to the back of the damn bus. Period. In order for a new mother to do her job, certain accommodations need to be made. We clearly do not have a nursery at any of our race tracks, and I don’t expect them to be constructed any time soon. Not only can a jockey also be a mother, I’d like to encourage women to consider the possibility and the profession. It is the right thing to do and it is good business.” - California Horse Racing Board chairman David Israel

Everything is more complicated than you think. You only see a tenth of what is true. There are a million little strings attached to every choice you make; you can destroy your life every time you choose. But maybe you won’t know for twenty years. And you’ll never ever trace it to its source. And you only get one chance to play it out. Just try and figure out your own divorce. And they say there is no fate, but there is: it’s what you create. Even though the world goes on for eons and eons, you are here for a fraction of a fraction of a second. Most of your time is spent being dead or not yet born. But while alive, you wait in vain, wasting years, for a phone call or a letter or a look from someone or something to make it all right. And it never comes or it seems to but doesn’t really. And so you spend your time in vague regret or vaguer hope for something good to come along. Something to make you feel connected, to make you feel whole, to make you feel loved.

—Charlie Kaufman, Synecdoche, New York (via insipidexpectations)

“Everything is more complicated than you think. You only see a tenth of what is true. There are a million little strings attached to every choice you make; you can destroy your life every time you choose. But maybe you won’t know for twenty years. And you’ll never ever trace it to its source. And you only get one chance to play it out. Just try and figure out your own divorce. And they say there is no fate, but there is: it’s what you create. Even though the world goes on for eons and eons, you are here for a fraction of a fraction of a second. Most of your time is spent being dead or not yet born. But while alive, you wait in vain, wasting years, for a phone call or a letter or a look from someone or something to make it all right. And it never comes or it seems to but doesn’t really. And so you spend your time in vague regret or vaguer hope for something good to come along. Something to make you feel connected, to make you feel whole, to make you feel loved.”
Charlie Kaufman, Synecdoche, New York (via insipidexpectations)

(via burnagain)